Write For Us

Advertise

National Native American Heritage Month

November is federally recognized as National Native American Heritage Month (NNAHM). During this month, American Indian and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) are honored and celebrated for their rich and varied cultures, traditions, history, and societal contributions. NNAHM gives us an opportunity to become more educated about Native Americans, increase our knowledge of the unique challenges faced by this population, and better understand the historical and contemporary impact of Indigenous peoples on the nation.

The contributions and achievements of Native Americans were first recognized during May 1916 in New York, called American Indian Day . This came about due to the efforts of Red Fox James, a member of the Blackfeet Nation, who rode from state to state on horseback seeking approval from 24 state governments for a day to honor Native Americans. In 1976, President Gerald Ford proclaimed October 10-16 Native American Awareness Week. A decade later, Congress passed S.J. Res. 390 , petitioning that the president call November 23-30 “American Indian Week.” In subsequent years Congress continued this practice, declaring one week during the autumn months Native American Indian Heritage Week. 

In 1990, a joint resolution was passed by Congress and signed into law by President George H. W. Bush, officially designating November as National Native American Heritage Month. This recognition was a result of efforts to honor the original inhabitants of America and their significant contributions to the country and the world.

Each year, a specific theme is chosen to guide the celebrations, the theme for 2023 is “Tribal Nations Soaring to New Heights,” highlighting the resilience and achievements of tribal nations. Throughout the month, various events, educational programs, and cultural activities take place to promote awareness and understanding of Native American heritage. These activities often include art exhibitions, storytelling, traditional music and dance performances, and educational initiatives.

One crucial aspect of Native American heritage is the preservation of indigenous languages. Many Native American languages are endangered, and efforts to revitalize and pass them on to younger generations are ongoing.

Language is a fundamental aspect of cultural identity, and by promoting the preservation of native languages, Native American Heritage Month aims to ensure the continuation of these rich linguistic traditions.

National Native American Heritage Month also serves as an opportunity to recognize the achievements and contributions of Native Americans to various fields, including art, literature, science, and public service. For instance, it acknowledges the accomplishments of individuals such as Diane Humetewa, the first female Native American federal judge, and Chief Standing Bear, a prominent figure in Native American civil rights history. With over 500 recognized tribes, each with its own unique traditions, languages, and histories, there is an incredible wealth of diversity to explore. From the Inuit of the Arctic to the Navajo of the Southwest, Native American Heritage

 Month encourages a deeper understanding and appreciation of the multitude of indigenous people. Native Americans have made significant contributions to various fields, including art, science, literature, and sports. Notable figures like Maria Tallchief (Osage), the first Native American prima ballerina, or Jim Thorpe (Sac and Fox), an iconic athlete known for his accomplishments in football and the Olympics, showcase the diversity of achievements within the indigenous community. Native American Heritage Month serves as a platform to highlight these accomplishments and inspire future generations and honor the legacy and ongoing vitality of the Native American communities.  Their rich cultural practices and traditions include storytelling, music, dance, art, and spiritual beliefs. Many tribes have preserved their traditional ways of life, including hunting, fishing, and farming practices. Powwows ( Native American gatherings where they sing, dance, reconnect with old friends and celebrate their rich ancestral histories),  festivals, and other celebrations bring together Native American communities to share food, songs, dances, and stories. Thus allowing Native American cultures to continue to thrive.

Latest

AANHPI Community’s Dynamic Contributions

Innovation is the stepping stone to progress, and nowhere...

Tackling Mental Health Challenges

As the world evolves, so do the challenges faced...

The Real Estate Industry’s Technological Evolution

Chanel Di Blasi Associate Crosbie Gliner Schiffman Southard & Swanson (CGS3) San...

Stay in touch

Be the first to know

- Advertisement -

Don't miss

AANHPI Community’s Dynamic Contributions

Innovation is the stepping stone to progress, and nowhere...

Tackling Mental Health Challenges

As the world evolves, so do the challenges faced...

The Real Estate Industry’s Technological Evolution

Chanel Di Blasi Associate Crosbie Gliner Schiffman Southard & Swanson (CGS3) San...
- Advertisement -

AANHPI Community’s Dynamic Contributions

Innovation is the stepping stone to progress, and nowhere is this more evident than in the diverse  Asian American, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander (AANHPI)...

Tackling Mental Health Challenges

As the world evolves, so do the challenges faced by its inhabitants. Among the myriad issues confronting society today, mental health stands out as...

Culturally-responsive care: Anise Health transforming Mental health and serving diverse communities.

With growing diversity in the US, we believe that increasing access to affordable, effective, and culturally-responsive care is a necessity.    Please share the inspiration...